Frankincense and Myrrh

Boswellia-sacra

Getting to Know Frankincense and Myrrh

Once people have heard the word frankincense and myrrh, usually the first thing that comes in their mind is the biblical story in which these served as the gifts offered by the wise men when Jesus was born. Actually, these items were considered as valuable and expensive than any silver and gold. This is for the reason that both have aromatic elements all throughout the years. But aside its famous fragrance property, do you know that these two have also other uses?

Frankincense

Frankincense is also called as olibanum that comes from the species of plants like Boswellia thurifera B. sacra or B. carterii. These shrubs can only be found in the Red Sea region to northeast Africa. The word “frankincense” is derived after the Frankish Crusaders while the word “olibanum” meaning “the milk” derived from Arabic ‘‘al-lubán’’.

Boswellia sacra
Picture: wikipedia.org

The resin of this type of incense is gathered through creating cuts into the bark of its tree. The tears which then become an essential oil are used as perfumes, incense and aromatherapy that are widely helpful all over the world.

Myrrh

The name myrrh comes from the Hebrew word “murr” or “maror” which means bitter. Well, it really has a bitter taste. Myrrh is the same with frankincense in which it is collected in the bark of the tree. The tree comes from the specie of Commiphora that can be located at the eastern areas of Ethiopia and Somalia.

myrrh

The myrrh is also used in aromatherapy as well as serves as incense and fragrances. During the old ages, this was generally utilized within the process of embalming as it has the capacity to cover the toxic odor and delay the decay of a corpse. This is also used as powder especially on the biblical period. Because of its bitter taste, myrrh symbolizes sorrow, suffering and death.

frankincense and myrrh
 
frankincense and myrrh

Now, you know that frankincense and myrrh are not only used as scents but for several purposes as well.

Category(s): Incense
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